Paleantology & The Mesozoic Era

Paleantology & The Mesozoic Era

Jurassic Park

Blue Room: Dinosaur Stories

This month we will be transforming the Blue Room into a place of dinosaur wonder through the exploration of four stories.

Week 1: Patrick's Dinosaurs

To start the month we will be introducing students to the world of dinosaurs through the story, “Patrick’s Dinosaurs.” “Patrick’s Dinosaurs” is a magical story where a little boy named Patrick imagines that there are dinosaurs around him as he goes through his day with his big brother Hank. This story is the perfect way to get students excited about the Dinosaur theme and teaches students small details about the dinosaurs in the story. We will introduce students to new vocabulary words (plants, dinosaur, jaws, walnut, teeth) at the beginning of the week and revisit them throughout the week. This will give students the opportunity to potentially begin remembering some of the vocabulary words by sight by the end of the week. The vocabulary words are a way to expose students to a variety of print as well as provide teaching opportunities for letter recognition. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives and will have been exposed to multiple Alphabet Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the vocabulary words associated with the story.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of an “author” and “illustrator” as well as the author and illustrator of “Patrick’s Dinosaurs.”
  3. Start to make predictions about the story and participating in question and answer sessions regarding elements of the story.

Week 2: Big Old Bones

Week 2 will be focused on the world created by the story, “Big Old Bones: A Dinosaur Tale” by Carol Carrick. “Big Old Bones: A Dinosaur Tale” is an adventurous story about a professor who discovers some dinosaur bones in the Old West. The Professor brings the bones back to his laboratory in an attempt to put them back together in their proper form with the help of his young assistant, his dog and his wife. It is a story filled with laughs and is sure to have students giggling by its end. Week 2 is similar to week 1 in that students will be introduced to new vocabulary words (bone, books, Earth, skin, big). Students will also be practicing their sequencing skills using pictures from the story. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives and will have been exposed to multiple Alphabet Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the vocabulary words associated with the story.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of an “author” and “illustrator” as well as the author and illustrator of “Big Old Bones: A Dinosaur Tale.”
  3. Begin making predictions about the story and participating in question and answer sessions regarding elements of the story.

Week 3: The Berenstain Bears and the Missing Dinosaur Bone

During week 3 we will be turning your students into detectives to solve two cases involving missing dinosaur bones! Both stories, “The Berenstain Bears and the Missing Dinosaur Bone” by Jan and Stan Berenstain and “The Lost Dinosaur Bone” by Mercer Mayer, take place inside a museum where a dinosaur bone has gone missing! The Berenstain Bears and Little Critter come to the rescue! These stories are a great way to get students excited about learning about fossils and potentially becoming dinosaur detectives themselves! Week 3 is similar to week 1 in that we will be introducing students to new vocabulary words (museum, monkey, stars, exhibit, scientist, noon, bear, dog, time, vase) as well as helping students through sequencing the stories. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives and will have been exposed to multiple Alphabet Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the vocabulary words associated with the story.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of an “author” and “illustrator” as well as the author and illustrator of “The Berenstain Bears and the Missing Dinosaur Bone” and “The Lost Dinosaur Bone.”
  3. Begin making predictions about the story and participating in question and answer sessions regarding elements of the story.

Week 4: Finding Dinosaur Bones at School

The last week of the month will provide students with the opportunity to create their very own dinosaur story from some dinosaur bones they find at school. Since they have been exposed to four books written about dinosaurs throughout the month, they should already have some knowledge about how dinosaur stories are commonly written and should be able to provide valuable input in the creation of one.  By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives and will have been exposed to multiple Alphabet Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objective

Be an active participant in the creative writing process.

Learning Goals

Reading Comprehension:

2.2  Use predictions and context to make predictions about story content (level k).

2.5  Ask and answer questions about essential elements of a text (level k).

Letters:

Recognition, Sounds and Writing.

Providing learning opportunities for letters is an essential component of the Blue Room experience. Letters are integrated into practically every lesson taught simply by briefly calling students’ attention to letters throughout the reading of a story, or allowing them the opportunity to write a letter or word on their theme-related project.

Green Room: Jurassic Park: An Exploration of Dinosaurs

This month the green room will be transformed into Jurassic Park over the course of 4 weeks. Not only will this inspire students to learn more about Dinosaurs, it will also create many teaching opportunities for all of the learning goals.

Week 1: Where & When did the Dinosaurs Live?

To start the month we will be introducing students to the amazing, prehistoric world that dinosaurs lived in. This includes teaching about the Mesozoic Era as well as introducing students to the concept of a timeline so that they will start to understand just how long ago 65 million years is! During week 1 we will begin transforming the Green Room into a physical representation of the terrain typically thought to be seen during the Mesozoic Era. By the end of the month, the classroom’s transformation into Jurassic Park will be complete! By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives as well having been exposed to multiple Number and Shape Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. When and Where the Dinosaurs lived (i.e. during the Mesozoic Era and in many places around the globe). They should also be familiar with the concept of a timeline.
  2.  Types of habitats - On land only (forests, jungles, plains etc.), since dinosaurs did not fly or live in the water (water- dwellers of that time were called “marine reptiles” and flyers were called “flying reptiles” not dinosaurs).

Week 2: Herbivorous Dinosaurs & Plant Life

For the rest of the month we will be teaching in the Jurassic Park created by the students! During week 2 students will be introduced to the life of an herbivorous dinosaur. We begin the second week by allowing each class to choose their own herbivorous dinosaur to learn about. Each class will create a herd of herbivores which will then be the vessels through which they learn. Students will follow their herd as it makes its way through Jurassic Park learning about different aspects of their herbivorous dinosaurs along the way (i.e. what they ate, where they lived, their predators, etc.). By the end of the week  students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives as well as having been exposed to numerous Number and Shape Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Familiarity with the term herbivore.
  2. Familiarity with at least 2 traits of an herbivorous dinosaur (i.e. ate plants, had flat teeth, moved in herds, defensive adaptations, etc.)

Week 3: Omnivorous & Carnivorous Dinosaurs

During week 3 we will be introducing students to the lives of carnivorous and omnivorous dinosaurs. We will begin week 3 by allowing each class to choose an omnivore and a carnivore to study. We then start with a group project to create the omnivore and the carnivore they have decided to learn about.  Students will follow their dinosaur as it makes its way through Jurassic Park learning about different aspects of their omnivore or carnivore along the way (i.e. what they ate, where they lived, their predators, etc.) By the end of the week your students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives as well having been exposed to multiple Number and Shape Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the terms carnivore and omnivore as well as some of their traits (i.e. sharp teeth, bi-pedal, therapods, etc.)
  2.  Familiarity with 1 least on carnivore and 1 omnivore.
  3. The hunting behavior of 1 carnivore

Week 4: Paleontologists & Fossils

During week 4 we will be introducing students to the science of paleontology, the fossils found by paleontologists and theories regarding the disappearance of dinosaurs. A large amount of your focus for week 4 will be to guide our students through an understanding that most of what the world knows about dinosaurs comes from paleontologists and their work on fossils. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives as well as having been exposed to multiple Number and Shape Opportunities.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the term paleontology and what paleontologists do.
  2. Know what fossils are and some of the places around the world they have been found.
  3.  Be familiar with two theories about what happened to the dinosaurs

Learning Goals

Life Science (level k)

2a Students know how to observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of plants and animals.

Number Sense (level k):

1.3 Know that the larger numbers describe sets with more objects in them than the smaller numbers have. This is not an exciting concept as it reads for any age we deliver this concept in a different package. The teaching of this learning goal is wrapped into lessons designed for more exciting theme based projects and games.

2.1 Use concrete objects to determine the answers to addition and subtraction problems (for two numbers that are each less than 10). This is an advanced concept so we make sure that each lesson plan adjusts the concept slightly so that it is age appropriate for the younger students.

Numbers and Shapes:

Recognition, Writing Numbers and Drawing Shapes Providing learning opportunities for numbers and shapes is an essential component of teaching in the Green Room. Students should be practicing their number and shape recognition skills on a daily basis.

Red Room: The Art of David Krentz

This month we will be transforming the Red Room into an art studio. Students will have the opportunity to work with a variety of art mediums as they work through the month.

 

Week 1: Dinosaur Drawing & Animation

To start the month we will turn the Red Room into an art studio. Shelves in the classroom will be filled with materials needed to be an artist, an animator, a sculptor and a painter (i.e. paint, brushes, crayons, pencils, paper, clay, popsicle sticks, empty paper towel rolls etc.) As we move through the month we will post examples of the types of artwork students will be participating in (i.e. drawing, painting and sculpting) as well as the tools needed to complete it. Week 1 begins with an introduction to the world of dinosaur art using the artist of the month, David Krentz. Students will get a brief biography of the artist (www.krentzpresentz.com) and watch the video, “Krentz Presents Tyrannosaurus Rex.” While watching the video we will discuss what they are seeing, and encourage students to follow what David Krentz is doing. The rest of the week will be focused on dinosaur animation and drawing. By using tracing as a means to draw we can turn our students into mini animators! The music of the month, “Soundscapes of the Dinosaurs,” will be playing  in the background while students are working. By the end of the week your students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Know who David Krentz is and what he does.
  2. Start to become familiar with speaking about art they have created including types of mediums used (i.e. pencil, crayon, paint, clay, etc.)
  3. Be familiar with the term animation and how it is done. Have created their own dinosaur animation.

Week 2: Dinosaur Painting

During week 2 we will turn your little artists into painters! The inspiration for painting during week 2 will come from images of dinosaurs displayed in the classroom. By the end of the week, students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Remember who David Krentz is and what he does.
  2. Become more familiar with speaking about art they have created including types of mediums used (i.e. pencil, crayon, paint, clay, etc.)
  3. Be familiar with the tools needed to paint (i.e. paper, paintbrushes, paint, etc.) Have created their own painting of a dinosaur.

Week 3: Dinosaur Sculpting

During week 3, we will be transforming your little artists again, this time into dinosaur sculptors! Like in week 2, we place pictures around the room to inspire the art of the students. Creating a sculpture is a process. Students will first draw what they would like to sculpt so they are able to go to work with a plan. Working through the sculpting process (i.e. researching, planning, drawing, and sculpting) will be a week-long process. The more time students spend learning about their subject and planning, the more successful they will be when it comes to working with the clay. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Remember who David Krentz is and what he does.
  2. Become more familiar with speaking about art they have created including types of mediums used (i.e. pencil, crayon, paint, clay, etc.) Be familiar with tools and materials needed to sculpt (i.e. clay, carving tools, detailing tools, spatulas, etc.).
  3. Have created their own dinosaur sculpture.

Week 4: Dinosaur Art Show

During week 4 students will be creating and participating in a dinosaur art show! All of their hard work throughout the month will pay off when they get to display their artwork for all to see! During the art show, students are encouraged to make notes of the art they see in their journals. When the art show is over we will regroup on the carpet and lead students through a discussion about their favorite works of art. By the end of the week students should have a basic understanding of the Sub Theme Objectives.

Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Know the purpose of an art show.
  2. Be an active participant in an art show by displaying and observing works of art.
  3. Be comfortable speaking about art they have created including types of mediums used (i.e. pencil, crayon, paint, clay, etc.)

Learning Goals

Music (level K):

4.1 Create movements that correspond to specific music.

Visual Arts (level K):

4.3 Discuss how and why they made a specific work of art. This learning goal will be addressed each time students create something in the Red Room this month.

5.4 Discuss the various works of art (e.g., ceramics, paintings, sculpture) that artists create and the type of media used.

Artist of the Month: David Krentz

Students will be learning about David Krentz, an animator, artist, and sculptor of dinosaurs. Students will be mimicking his work throughout the month as well as adding their own personal touches to the work they do. David Krentz’s artwork easily captures the imagination of any child and leaves them yearning for more!

Music of the Month:

“Soundscapes of the Dinosaurs” by Douglas Irvine The music of the month will be worked into many of our lessons. Music is a great inspiration for projects and creates an inviting and stimulating learning environment.

Color:

Recognition & Primary vs. Secondary Providing learning opportunities for colors is an essential component of learning in the Red Room. Students will be practicing their color recognition skills on a daily basis and have the opportunity to blend colors several times a month.