Culture Shock! Authors, Inventors & Music That Changed The World

Culture Shock! Authors, Inventors & Music That Changed The World

All about authors

Blue Room: Authors That Changed The World

This month we will take our preschoolers on a journey through time, allowing them to experience and learn about some of the most famous and talented authors the world has seen.

Week 1: Aesop

Little is known about the man we call Aesop. It is believed that he lived and created his stories around 500 BC. No one knows exactly from where he came, just that he became famous during his lifetime for the stories he told. These fables, as they came to be known, always had some sort of meaning or lesson to be learned. Aesop’s Fables were orally passed on through the years and were finally written down around 300 BC. It was not until 1484 when his fables were finally published in the English language (Cech, 2009). Week 1 will begin with the history of Aesop and through a variety of lessons students will come to understand what a Fable is along with it's purpose. The week will end with students producing their own fables which always yields impressive results.

Week 1 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the life of the famous storyteller, Aesop, and know from when and where his stories are believed to be originated.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of a fable.
  3. Be familiar with at least 5 of Aesop’s fables through the use of the book, “Aesop’s Fables” retold John Cech and have explored the illustrations drawn by Martin Jarrie, understanding how the illustrations help to tell the story.
  4. Have created or participated in the creation of a new fable including the drawing of illustrations.

Week 2: Beatrix Potter

Week 2 will be focused on learning about and experiencing the work of the beloved children’s book author, Beatrix Potter. Beatrix Potter was raised in Victorian England and taught at home by governesses. Beatrix loved learning about nature and kept a journal in which she wrote about things in her life as well as sketched things in nature that she observed. Beatrix Potter was a woman ahead of her time, especially since most published authors in the late 1800’s were men. But this did not stop Beatrix otter. In 1901, she self-published, “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” and after the 250 copies had quickly sold out, signed on with the publisher Frederick Warne and Co. Beatrix Potter went on to write 22 more books over the next 28 years, ensuring her literary legacy.

Week 2 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the life of the beloved author, Beatrix Potter.
  2. Have explored, “Beatrix otter A Journal” to understand where Beatrix otter gained inspiration for her work.
  3. Read “ The Tale of Peter Rabbit ” by Beatrix Potter paying close attention to the illustrations, understanding that Beatrix Potter was also the illustrator of the book.
  4. Have created or participated in the creation of a short story using the information gathered from students’ journals/field notes throughout the week.

Week 3: J.R.R. Tolkien

During week 3 students will be introduced to JRR Tolkien and the magical worlds and creatures he created through his writing. John Ronal Reuel Tolkien was born in 1892 in South Africa. At the age of 3 he returned with his family to England. Tolkien took an interest in languages at a very early age and even mused about inventing languages at the age of nine (www.tolkien-online.com). Tolkien’s love of language did not subside and in 1916 while recovering from trench fever, began to write. It was not until 1937 when Tolkien’s first fiction novel, “The Hobbit” was published.

Week 3 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the life of the author, JRR Tolkien and understand why his works have made him so famous.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of a fiction novel.
  3. Have been introduced to the world created by Tolkien in “ The Hobbit ” including the magical characters he created.
  4. Have participated in a reenactment of “The Hobbit.”

Week 4: Stan Lee

The last week of the month will be focused on yet another of the world’s most famous authors, the comic book master, Stan Lee. Stan Lee was born Stanley Martin Lieber in New York on December 28, 1922. As a boy he always enjoyed writing and at the age of 16, after graduating from high school, started working for Timely Comics. At first, he just filled ink wells and brought lunch to the writers, until 1941 when he wrote his first comic book filler, “Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge.” He soon moved from writing filler to writing comics in their entirety and went on to create Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Avengers, Iron Man, the Hulk and many more superheroes that the world has come to love. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Lee) Stan Lee is now known as a comic genius and has forever changed the limits of our imaginations and our culture with his magnificent superhero creations.

Week 4 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Become familiar with the life of the comic book author, Stan Lee and understand why his works have made him so well-known.
  2. Be familiar with the definition of a comic book.
  3. Have read at least one comic strip from the book, “ he A azi g Spide - a ” including an exploration of the illustrations by Steve Ditko.
  4. Have participated in the creation of a comic strip using characters from Stan ee’s “The Amazing Spider-man.”

Learning Goals

Literary Response & Analysis (1st grade-level)

3.2 Describe the roles of authors and illustrators and their contributions to print materials

Written & Oral English Language Conventions (1st grade-level)

1.7 Capitalize the first word of a sentence, names of people, and the pronoun I.

Writing (level K)

1.1 Use letters and phonetically spelled words to write about experiences, stories, people, objects, or events.

Letters: Recognition, Sounds and Writing

Green Room: Inventors That Changed The World

This month students will take a journey through history “meeting” several of the most important individuals in history. Without the inventions of these amazing men, our world and the society we live in would be a very different place. We will be transforming the Green Room into a preschool laboratory where students are not only given the opportunity to learn about several famous inventors of our time, but also dabble in the art of inventing!

Week 1: Thomas Edison & the Light Bulb

To start the month, we will be introducing students to one of the most famous men in history, Thomas Alva Edison. Thomas Edison, while best known for his perfection of the light bulb technology, made several inventions that contributed greatly to society. Born on February 11, 1847, Thomas Alva Edison was curious about the world around him from a very early age. He experimented constantly, his first true invention being the phonograph in 1878. Inventing a light bulb, the “invention” he is most famous for, for commercial use was not far behind in 1879. Thomas Edison went on to invent and create a great many thing before his death in 1931 (i.e. cinema projection, kinetophone, cement plant, etc.).

Week 1 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Be familiar with who Thomas Edison was and why he is an important part of history.
  2. Know the definition of “inventor” and “patent.”
  3. Be familiar with the invention of the light bulb as well as other inventions made by Thomas Edison (i.e. phonograph).
  4. Have discussed how the invention of the light bulb has changed society and the manner in which people live their lives.
  5. Participate in the creation of a laboratory and participate in the experimentation process.

Week 2: Alexander Graham Bell & the Telephone

Alexander Graham Bell was born in Scotland on March 3rd, 1847. Known as Aleck to his friends and family, Alexander Graham Bell had an interest in experimentation from a very early age, and like his father, he had a particular interest in language and sound. His mother going deaf when he was only ten years of age merely fueled his interest in one day creating something that would help people communicate. Aleck began inventing at an early age, and at the age of eleven Aleck invented a machine that removed husks from grains of wheat. At the age of thirteen, Aleck graduated from high school and moved to London. When he returned to Scotland, Aleck started teaching and studying speech at a local academy. In 1871, Bell’s life eventually brought him to Massachusetts where he taught deaf children in schools. He then he moved on and become a professor at Boston University teaching college students about speech. It was in 1876 when Alexander Graham Bell would finally invent something that would forever change the way in which people communicate: the telephone (Time for Kids, 2006).

Week 2 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Be familiar with who Alexander Graham Bell was and why he is an important part of history.
  2. Know the definition of “inventor” and “patent.”
  3. Be familiar with the invention of the telephone as well as other scientific contributions made by Alexander Graham Bell.
  4. Have discussed how the invention of the telephone has changed society and the manner in which people live their lives.
  5. Participate in the experimentation process in the Green Room Laboratory.

Week 3: Philo Farnsworth & the Television

During week 3 students will be introduced to another inventor who contributed greatly to society: Philo Farnsworth. Although his name does not come to mind when one thinks about the TV, Philo Farnsworth is indeed the man who invented the television. The manner in which he proceeded with his invention once created is the cause of his name being absent from inventor history. You will delve deeper into this mystery with your students while reading the book, “The Boy Who Invented TV: The Story of Philo Farnsworth” by Kathleen Krull.

Week 3 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Be familiar with who Philo Farnsworth was and why he is an important part of history.
  2. Know the definition of “inventor” and “patent.”
  3. Be familiar with the invention of the television by reading the book, “The oy Who Invented TV” by Kathleen Krull.
  4. Have discussed how the invention of the TV has changed society and the manner in which people live their lives.
  5. Have participated in the creation of an “invention” to be used in today’s world.

Week 4: The Toothbrush & Band-Aids

During week 4 students will be introduced to inventions that changed the way in which the world viewed hygiene. These inventions are also quite familiar to our students in that they personally use them on a daily basis. What are these marvelous inventions? The toothbrush and the band aid!

William Addis first dreamed up the idea of the toothbrush while spending some time in jail for starting a riot. While in jail he had no effective way to clean his teeth, so he took a bone from one of his meals, bore holes into it and placed some bristles, courtesy of a guard, into the holes. When he was released he founded the Addis Toothbrush Company and began to mass produce the toothbrush. By 1840, toothbrushes were being mass produced in several countries all over the world. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toothbrush).

Earle Dickson is yet another man who contributed to society by inventing the band aid. Earle Dickson worked for Johnson and Johnson in 1921 as a cotton buyer, the same year he would invent the band aid. Inspiration for the invention came from Dickson’s wife who was always cutting her fingers in the kitchen. In 1921, cuts were bandaged with gauze and adhesive tape. Dickson wondered if he could create something that would better fit a small cut as well as move with the contours of the hand. Thus, the band aid was born. http://inventors.about.com/od/bstartinventions/a/bandaid.htm

Week 4 Sub Theme Objectives:

  1. Be familiar with the inventor of the toothbrush, William Addis, as well as the history behind the invention of the toothbrush.
  2. Be familiar with the inventor of the band aid, Earle Dickson, as well as the history behind the invention of the band aid.
  3. Have discussed how the inventions of the toothbrush and the band aid have changed society and the manner in which people live.

Learning Goals

People Who Make a Difference (2nd grade-level):

2.5 Students understand the importance of individual action and character and explain how heroes from long ago and the recent past have made a difference in the lives of others

Investigation & Experimentation (1st grade-level):

4a Draw pictures that portray some features of the thing being described

Algebra & Functions (1st grade-level):

1.2 Understand the meaning of the symbols +, −, =

Numbers and Shapes:

Recognition, Writing Numbers and Drawing Shapes

Red Room: Music That Changed The World

This month our preschools will be “on-tour” with musicians who created some of the greatest music during some of the most important eras in history. We will be taking students on a journey through time allowing them to experience music from the mid to late 20th century. Throughout their journey they will also learn about the inspiration behind each era of music.

Week 1: The Era of Swing

We will start our tour in the 1930’s and 1940’s during the era of swing. Swing music started its rise in popularity after the Great Depression. During the 1930’s swing could be heard on records and the radio and had reached every city in America due to the amount of traveling around the U.S. the bands did. The swing era is considered by many to have been a cultural revolution where clothing, dancing and even speech changed to fit into the mold of the day. Jitterbug dancing also became hugely popular during the swing era. Popular artists included Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald (http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/hist409/swing.html, 2011).

Week 1 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Know the history behind the swing era including societal changes that were occurring at this time that may have contributed to the development of the music.
  2. Be familiar with at least 2 musicians from the swing era.
  3. Have created a piece of artwork inspired by the music of the swing era.

Week 2: The Birth of Rock & Roll

During week 2 we will continue on our tour of some of the greatest music eras in history. Week 2 will shift focus to the music of the 1950’s and the birth of rock and roll. There is an ongoing debate between music historians as to when the birth of rock and roll actually occurred. Some will cite it as being as early as the 1930’s while others claim that rock and roll wasn’t truly born” until the 1950’s. If you look at societal changes that influenced music (i.e. technology) you may come to the conclusion that technology and popular culture coincided to produce this new kind of music in 1948 (http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2008/1/1948-and-the-birth-of-rock-and-roll-music, 2011). Needless to say, with it rock and roll brought a whole new era of young culture which translated into new styles of dress, dance and speech.

Week 2 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Know the history behind the “ of Rock & Roll” including societal changes that were occurring at this time that may have contributed to the development of the music.
  2.  Be familiar with at least 2 musicians from the rock roll era of the 50’s.
  3. Have created a piece of artwork inspired by the music of the rock roll era of the 50’s.

Week 3: The Woodstock Age

Week 3 brings with it another musical adventure! Our tour continues onto the 1960’s, the Woodstock age. Music began to change and evolve at an incredible rate after the 1950’s. With the Woodstock age came many new and different approaches to music. It was during this time when the “ ritish Invasion” of American music occurred. However there were many other genres of music being created during this time as well such as: Motown Music, Classic Rock and “Message Music.” During the Woodstock age each of these genres developed their own unique sound and image contributing to the perceived chaos of this time in history.

Week 3 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Know the history behind the Woodstock age including societal changes that were occurring at this time that may have contributed to the development of the music.
  2. Be familiar with at least 2 musicians from the Woodstock age.
  3. Have created a piece of artwork inspired by the music of the Woodstock age.

Week 4: The Hip Hop Generation

During week 4 students will be ending their musical tour with the hip hop generation. Hip hop music developed as a “hip hop” culture began to emerge during the 1970’s. Hip hop is defined by four distinct elements: rapping, scratching, sampling and beat boxing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip_hop_music). Hip hop has evolved over the decades from Old School hip hop to New School hip hop to the Golden Age of hip hop. Each transition brought with it a new way of approaching this genre of music, however it is the hip hop of the 1990’s that caused hip hop to finally become an integral part of popular music. From this point on many American songs would contain components of hip hop for generations to come.

Week 4 Sub Theme Objectives

  1. Know the history behind the hip hop generation including societal changes that were occurring at this time that may have contributed to the development of the music.
  2. Be familiar with at least 2 musicians from the hip hop generation.
  3. Have created a piece of artwork inspired by the music of the hip hop generation.

Learning Goals

Dance (1st grade-level)

3.4 Identify where and when people dance

Music

3.4 Use developmentally appropriate movements in responding to music from various genres and styles (level K)

4.2 Describe how ideas or moods are communicated through music (1st grade-level) 5.2 Identify and talk about the reasons artists have for creating music (level K)

Music of the Month:

Music from Different eras in the 20th Century

Color:

Recognition & Primary vs. Secondary